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Brian Casey is leaving the presidency at DePauw University to take over at Colgate.

Brian W. Casey, president of DePauw University in Indiana, will become the 17th president of Colgate University in New York.

Casey has led “DePauw 2020,” a multiyear strategic plan. And under his leadership, DePauw has invested in academic programs, campus projects, student advising and postgraduate planning, plus established and secured more than $56 million for The DePauw Trust.

Prior to joining DePauw in 2008, Casey served as associate dean for academic affairs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard. He is also a former assistant provost at Brown.

President Obama scrapped his long proposed college rating system in favor of a “scorecard” system unveiled in September. The news caught higher ed leaders by surprise, leaving some dismayed to be left out of the planning process.

Academia’s cyber preparedness (or lack thereof) has received less media attention than that of certain retailers and financial institutions, but nonetheless the cyber risks confronting universities are pervasive and alarming. Consider recent breaches suffered by educational institutions. At the University of Maryland, an outside source gained access to a secure records database that held information dating back to 1998, including names, social security numbers, dates of birth, and university identification numbers for over 300,000 people affiliated with the university on two campuses.

There is an opportunity that many universities are unaware of that can provide immediate tax cash savings. If you have conducted renovations to your buildings in the past, you may be in a position to take advantage of recently released Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) regulations. The following provides a brief background of the opportunity, outlines the characteristics of entities that can benefit, and also provides a roadmap for how to take advantage of this benefit.

Models of Excellence honorees from five colleges and universities were recognized at the program’s inaugural awards ceremony during NACUBO. Pictured (left to right) are Mandy Eppley, Eastern Kentucky University; Daniel Kinnaman, UB; Andy Clark, Valdosta State University; Anna Jensen, Indiana University; Bill Thrisk, Marist College; Shane Burgess, The University of Arizona; Jeff Ratje, The University of Arizona; and Andrew Crawford, Higher One. (Photo: Erika Chambers Photography)

Recognizing colleges and universities that make student success a priority through innovative initiatives is the purpose of UB’s new Models of Excellence award program.

To honor recipient schools from the first two rounds of the program, a celebratory dinner was hosted by the program’s sponsor, Higher One, during NACUBO’s annual meeting in Nashville in July. The event was held at the Old Hickory Steakhouse at the Gaylord Opryland Resort, where the conference was located.

Incoming Kent State freshmen studying at the university’s Florence, Italy, campus have opportunities to take sightseeing trips to Bologna and other cities.

Study abroad has been reserved traditionally for upperclassmen, but institutions that include Michigan State, Kent State, Florida State, American University and the University of New Haven are offering students the chance to learn overseas before or during their first year of college.

ERM policies being executed tend to share one major approach: sharing ownership of various risks campuswide.

With YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets, virtually nothing escapes the public’s notice, and judgment. It’s one reason higher education is paying much more attention to risk management now than in the past.

On campus to walk: Graduates of Southern New Hampshire University’s online College for America program are invited to participate in the graduation ceremonies at the institution’s Manchester campus.

After years of quiet evolution, the competency-based education movement is now poised for explosive growth, with several hundred colleges and universities developing programs that fundamentally redefine the college degree.

Brian Hazlett is vice president of student affairs and enrollment management, and Roger Bruszewski is vice president of finance and administration at Millersville University of Pennsylvania.

It has been said that it takes a village to raise a child. To make a huge change at a university, it takes the entire village, a.k.a. a really good team, to make it happen. Here’s our story.

Millersville University of Pennsylvania has 7,500 undergraduates, 1,000 graduate students, seven unions representing faculty and staff, and a $152 million budget.

Source: “Self-Reported Concussion among NCAA Student-Athletes,” NCAA, February 2014 (Click to enlarge)

Wrestling, ice hockey and football have the highest concussion rates among men's sports. Ice hockey, field hockey and lacrosse top the list for women.

Fans at a University of New Haven football game might notice an odd sideline sight: medical personnel with their heads hunched over smartphones. But these athletic trainers are not checking text messages or updating their Facebook status. Rather, they are monitoring real-time data about the force of their players’ on-field collisions.

Without a doubt, social media has become one of the, if not the most, effective and efficient way for colleges and universities to communicate. Connected institutions can conduct “digital conversations” while sharing and collecting thoughts, ideas, information, opinions, images and video.

About 70 students are currently enrolled in the Goucher Prison Education Partnership, which receives no public funding. (Photo: Rob Ferrell courtesy of Goucher College)

A small-scale program that will give prisoners Pell Grants to pursue college degrees represents a symbolic step toward expanding access to higher education. But only a fraction of the inmates who could benefit will receive financial aid, experts say.

The 34,430-square-foot, three-story Convergent Media Center at Capital University in Ohio will create a hub of activity where multiple disciplines can intersect.

Under construction on the site of a circa-1905 gymnasium, the 34,430-square-foot, three-story Convergent Media Center at Capital University in Ohio will create a hub of activity where multiple disciplines—including communications, electronic media, music and art—can intersect.

In just three years, enrollment at Lone Star Community College grew by about 50 percent. The six-campus system, located in the north Houston metro area, now has more than 95,000 students and has experienced explosive data growth, as well—from 40 terabytes to 1.6 petabytes.