From UB

An excellent strategy, poorly executed, will almost always fail. This is particularly true in financial aid offices, where timing, top-notch service delivery, and effective processing can be just as important as the financial aid offer itself.

Prospective students aren't all that picky about their admissions websites expectations--namely easy navigation and functions like campus visit scheduling.

It's fitting that the central campus of CPCC, located seconds from downtown Charlotte, N.C., has an inviting front door.

Think "workplace diversity," and people of various races and ethnicities likely come to mind. But those with disabilities are a group not to be forgotten.

To paraphrase Mark Twain's Comment about the weather, it seems that everyone complains about IT security, but no one does anything about it.

The U.S. House higher education subcommittee wants to create a federal college affordability index. The proposal has little to do with ranking colleges in a public image-building contest. It has everything to do with de facto price controls.

Chances are, a few years ago you decided it was about time for your institution to create and maintain a professional, centralized website.

The present consumer audience of parents and students intent on enrolling in a college of their choice has become increasingly savvy about the strategic efforts on the part of admissions committees to select applicants, in no small measure, with the yield factor in mind.

In recent years, college and university financial aid administrators and admissions personnel have witnessed the growth of an alarming trend--financial aid "consultants" who charge families for services offered for free by on-campus aid administrators.

Sometime this fall, Congress might renew the Higher Education Act (HEA). Then again, it might not.

The fall semester opened this year with unprecedented concern over the scope of plagiarism in higher education. A virtual epidemic of cheating, or perhaps just a new awareness, has spread across the academic world.

Most discussions on the rise of for-profit colleges begin and end with an arbitrary moral judgment that there's something inherently wrong with for-profit colleges, or an unfounded assertion that these institutions offer inferior academic programs.

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