From UB

After multiple additions, the character of an original building can get lost. But what's old can be made new again.

In the past decade, tremendous changes throughout the world have impacted the way we conduct business, interface with our global neighbors, lead our colleges and universities, and educate our students.

The most frequent out-sourced human resource functions at any college or university are usually payroll, employee assistance programs (EAP), and benefits administration. IHEs are certainly doing it, but at the end of the day, does outsourcing really save money?

There's one essential team quality that's often misunderstood: conflict. Many leaders mistakenly believe conflict among team members is bad. Actually, it is one of the best indicators of a healthy team.

In 1992, a two-year institution then known as Utah Valley Community College set out to launch degree programs at the baccalaureate level.

College campuses are often a mix of architectural styles: ivy-covered brick buildings, modern constructions with interiors bathed in natural light, enormous outdoor multiuse facilities. Whatever its style, a building's design and upkeep requires resources of time and money.

A new report by the James Irvine Foundation raises questions about campus demographic figures.

Recently while doing some research for a story, I was caught off guard when I found a web log purportedly written by Philip Eaton, president of Seattle Pacific University (Wash.). The blog was casual and witty, and, judging by the comments, apparently enjoyed a devoted following of readers.

U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings' commission on the Future of Higher Education should acknowledge that the historical business model for public higher education is irreparably broken.

The new vice president for diversity and equity was working behind the scenes at the University of Virginia before his position even kicked in.

Pages