From UB

Recently while doing some research for a story, I was caught off guard when I found a web log purportedly written by Philip Eaton, president of Seattle Pacific University (Wash.). The blog was casual and witty, and, judging by the comments, apparently enjoyed a devoted following of readers.

U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings' commission on the Future of Higher Education should acknowledge that the historical business model for public higher education is irreparably broken.

The new vice president for diversity and equity was working behind the scenes at the University of Virginia before his position even kicked in.

With a fountain, cupolas, and other aesthetic features, a 32,500-square-foot plaza serves as a campus centerpiece while alleviating a parking crunch for this Hyde Park, N.Y., college.

Just as library media centers and wireless implementations are keeping universities and colleges on the cutting edge of technology, so too are card programs trying to stay ahead, bringing more services and better access control into the mix.

What is the purpose of higher education? It's a question we should ask ourselves daily.

These are unsettling times for federal student aid.

Here we are again, flying out of Vegas on yet another business trip--pausing to consider the contemporary axiom that "what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas." Yet, somehow, we sensed this trip was different from the get-go.

The early application wave has almost passed. In its wake remain broken hearts, frantic rushes to the post office, shrugged shoulders, and searches for meaning.

Just as today's leader must have a handful of essential qualities and characteristics, the members of the effective marketing team must possess these qualities. The first, of course, is the desire, like the leader, to orbit a worthy vision.

Think about all of the job candidates you've interviewed over the past several years. There's a very good chance that one-third of them lied on their resume.

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