From UB

To paraphrase Mark Twain's Comment about the weather, it seems that everyone complains about IT security, but no one does anything about it.

The U.S. House higher education subcommittee wants to create a federal college affordability index. The proposal has little to do with ranking colleges in a public image-building contest. It has everything to do with de facto price controls.

Chances are, a few years ago you decided it was about time for your institution to create and maintain a professional, centralized website.

Star quarterbacks? Nobel laureates? Once upon a time, these people were the big deals on campuses. Now they have to make room for the new star, the endowment's hedge fund manager.

What's the harm in the occasional drip from a ceiling or crack in a sidewalk? For colleges and universities, plenty. Consider these scenarios:

Dave Berque, a computer science professor at DePauw University in Greencastle, Ind., got an odd wake-up call years ago when he was teaching a large class at an East Coast institution.

At New York's Manhattan School of Music, Linda McKnight is preparing to teach a Friday morning masterclass in double bass.

It has now been nearly 15 years since the first public policy debates emerged surrounding the invention of charter colleges or universities.

When I first began teaching at Queensborough Community College 34 years ago, I had a student who was a grade-school teacher. The first generation of kids exposed to "educational television" was entering his classroom. Are they better students, I asked?

For more than 25 years I have served on teams, occasionally led teams, and, as part of my work at Stamats, worked as a consultant to help client teams.

An excellent strategy, poorly executed, will almost always fail. This is particularly true in financial aid offices, where timing, top-notch service delivery, and effective processing can be just as important as the financial aid offer itself.

Days after our last issue hit the mail, Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast with Category 5 ferocity, decimating the fragile levee system that had protected New Orleans from flooding for more than a century.

Pages