From UB

A few weeks ago I attended a higher education media dinner, at which college and university presidents engaged in a freewheeling discussion of a number of issues raised by journalists. One topic that came up was the coverage, or lack of coverage, of community colleges. And they were right.

Licensing Dollars Boost Higher Education's Bottom Line

The challenge for today's colleges and universities is to reconcile their clear need to remain competitive while controlling their costs, which have been spiraling ever higher in recent years.

When Stephen Landry became chief information officer of Seton Hall University in South Orange, N.J., in 1996, the university had a pokey 56-kilobit telephone modem connection to the internet.

In 2004, Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., received an amazing gift.

I have always viewed communication as essential to the position of a university president. In my short time as president of Loyola University New Orleans, I have been guided by a basic, underlying commitment to be as open and transparent as possible in my decision-making.

With decreasing funding and increasing demand from students and faculty for the latest technology, smart spending of technology budgets is crucial at colleges and universities today.

It tantalizes the best millennial students with colorful and personalized brochures, screaming the student's name and interests.

Here's the good news: According to Chicago-area firm Teenage Research Unlimited, young people spent upwards of a whopping $169 billion in 2004. Those dollars can translate into significant business around colleges and can impact the way a school attracts Generation Y prospects.

In terms of expansion planning, University of St. Francis had done everything right. The Catholic institution in Joliet, Ill., got input from city officials and residents.

This fall a couple dozen students across the United States took up blogging for their alma maters. In occasional or weekly posts they offer slices of campus life that the Admissions office can share with prospective students and their parents.

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