From UB

What is the purpose of higher education? It's a question we should ask ourselves daily.

These are unsettling times for federal student aid.

Here we are again, flying out of Vegas on yet another business trip--pausing to consider the contemporary axiom that "what happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas." Yet, somehow, we sensed this trip was different from the get-go.

Just as today's leader must have a handful of essential qualities and characteristics, the members of the effective marketing team must possess these qualities. The first, of course, is the desire, like the leader, to orbit a worthy vision.

Think about all of the job candidates you've interviewed over the past several years. There's a very good chance that one-third of them lied on their resume.

Ask an admissions, financial aid, or enrollment management officer about their institution's "ratings." The conversation will likely turn to how the school stacks up in college guidebooks or U.S. News rankings.

What does collaboration mean to you? And how can it help your school meet its goals and possibly generate revenue?

A few weeks ago I attended a higher education media dinner, at which college and university presidents engaged in a freewheeling discussion of a number of issues raised by journalists. One topic that came up was the coverage, or lack of coverage, of community colleges. And they were right.

Licensing Dollars Boost Higher Education's Bottom Line

The challenge for today's colleges and universities is to reconcile their clear need to remain competitive while controlling their costs, which have been spiraling ever higher in recent years.

When Stephen Landry became chief information officer of Seton Hall University in South Orange, N.J., in 1996, the university had a pokey 56-kilobit telephone modem connection to the internet.

In 2004, Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., received an amazing gift.

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