From UB

THE QUESTIONABLE AC-tions of a few financial aid directors and a lack of clear guidance on private student loans sparked a political and media firestorm that associate all financial aid professionals with the questionable practices of less than 0.1 percent of the profession.

THE LEAGUE FOR INNOVA-tion in the Community College hasn't heard much about it. The American Association of Community Colleges says it's not a trend. The American Council on Education knows of one person who did it 10 years ago.

AT EASE IN THE PUBLIC SPOTLIGHT? CHECK. ADEPT AT RAISING funds? Got it. Comfortable with politics? Uh-huh. Able to build relationships with trustees? Yep.

LAST JANUARY KRISTA RODIN ARRIVED AS THE campus executive officer at Northern Arizona University Yuma with a major problem to solve. "Nothing was in place to serve Hispanic students," she says, even though they comprised 57 percent of the student body.

WHEN OFFICIALS AT HARRISBURG UNIVERSITY of Science and Technology (Pa.) commissioned an economic impact study in 2001, they admit that at the time there wasn't much impact to report.

WE ALL LIVE NEAR AN invisible line. One that parties on either side are reluctant to cross unless invited. A line that promotes stereotypes and perpetuates skepticism.

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