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Articles: Financial Services

Saying “We've got a crisis in terms of college affordability,” President Obama outlined a three part proposal to reign in the cost of higher education before a capacity crowd at the University at Buffalo Thursday. The appearance was the first of the president’s two-day bus tour through New York and Pennsylvania designed to call attention to high education costs.

“We can’t go about business as usual,” Obama said. "Our economy can't afford the trillion dollars in outstanding student loan debt.”

College students with no loan debt are more likely to lead a richer social life that involves partying, studying less, and forming relationships that will last long after graduation, a pair of University of Indiana sociologists says.

Ivy Tech Community College (Ind.) had a classic good news-bad news problem. The good news was that interest in the 31-campus, statewide institution was burgeoning. The bad news was that budget belt-tightening was limiting the ability of staff to tend to the growing attention needed by prospective students while also responding to the needs of current students.

One of the most sought-after nonsalary compensation items offered by higher education is full or partial tuition benefits for employees and their families. Free and reduced-cost degrees go a long way toward easing the impact of nonprofit salaries.

American Public University System (W.Va.) offers varying levels of such tuition benefits based on employee status. But the institution’s formerly manual registration process was ill-equipped to distinguish between different registration types, creating problems when it came to reporting, scholarship applications, and payment.

A few years ago, career services professionals at colleges and universities in the U.S. didn’t have much use for social media. But all that has changed. The Career Advisory Board, established by DeVry University, and the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) have released a new national survey, “Career Services Use of Social Media Technologies,” about college career centers sentiment toward and usage of social media.

Two-year students typically work more hours than four-year students and may have families to provide for

The prospect of employees with more money to invest, easier-to-understand investment options, more personalized customer service, and lower fees has colleges and universities rethinking their retirement plans and moving toward a single retirement services vendor.

Congress passed a continuing budget resolution in March, funding the federal government for another six months. Included in that resolution was an amendment by Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) prohibiting the National Science Foundation from funding political science research unless it is certified as promoting America’s national security or economic interests. Political science receives roughly $10 million annually in NSF research support and was the only academic discipline singled out.

When Jesica Rasmussen began looking into her university options three years ago, she had more on her mind than a typical college freshman. As the wife of an active-duty soldier in the U.S. Army, Rasmussen could expect many moves in her future. She could expect deployments when her husband was away for long periods of time, leaving her alone to care for their four children. She also had to find the funds to pay for school with limited budgets and financial programs available to military spouses.

For most colleges and universities, having students live on campus can provide a number of benefits, both in revenue and in classroom performance. So how can an institution maximize the benefits while creating an atmosphere that not only attracts a growing number of students, but also ensures that their experience is mutually beneficial? A comprehensive approach that emanates from the concept of providing improved value for the on-campus resident can have far reaching benefits for both student and school.

As rising tuition and the uncertain job market pressure families to spend their college savings wisely—and to even question the value of such spending—colleges and universities are more likely to be evaluated based on their return on investment. It is not just academic quality and prestige that today’s prospective students look for. They also demand a proven track record of graduate school admissions, job placements, and earning potential in relation to the overall cost of enrollment.

When the entire city of Boston was on lockdown during the April 19 manhunt for the marathon bombing suspects, institutions such as Boston College and Boston University were posting on Facebook to let admitted students know the status’ of open houses scheduled to occur that weekend.

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Stop Feeding the Monster. End the Coal Age. Divest the West. Sandy Says: Divest Climate Destruction. Bound by Fossil Fuels, Freed by Action.

Messages like these have emblazoned banners on campuses across the country since’s Fossil Free divestment campaign began last November.

When a group of venerable, high-profile universities that includes Georgetown and Villanova announced late last year that they were leaving the Big East, it may have seemed like just the latest reshuffling of collegiate athletic conferences in what has come to feel like an endless game of musical chairs. All of this recent turmoil in collegiate athletics is just a symptom, however. The larger problem is money—or, to be more specific—a lack of money.

Student groups at more than 60 college and universities hosted events to raise awareness and push for fossil fuel divestment as part of’s #FossilFreedom Day of Action.