Articles: Financial Services

09/2014

At a time when the gulf between liberals and conservatives seems to be wider than ever, there is one topic about which they agree: the reasons for the rising cost of a college education. Why do colleges and universities keep raising tuition, asks Timothy Noah in The New Republic?

08/2014
For the first time, students are paying, on average, half or more of their tuition’s cost. (Click to enlarge graphic)

Subsidies for public higher ed institutions are the lowest in a decade—and for the first time, students are paying, on average, half or more of their tuition’s cost.

08/2014
Credit Rating Rankings: Long-term ratings used for higher ed institutions. (Click to enlarge)

The U.S. economy has been through major changes in the last several years, and the effects are being felt on campus. In many cases, this turmoil shows up publicly in the form of a credit-rating downgrade.

08/2014
College sports should be recognized as a business, a federal judge has ruled.

Quick, what business makes more money than the NFL yet pays most of its workers next to nothing?

07/2014

The remodel of a dining hall at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro was going to displace more than 5,000 student mailboxes.

07/2014
Driving college loan defaults down

The coming change in how student loan default rates are calculated may mean bad news for some colleges and universities.

07/2014

“We include in our emails a link to a brief video that explains that we are counselors, not collectors, working on behalf of the college the borrower attended, and that we work with borrowers and their loan servicers to resolve their loan payment issues.

07/2014
Tough economic times are forcing campus CFOs to expand their roles.

Rising operating costs, unstable revenue streams and continued tough economic times are forcing the campus CFO’s role to grow, say higher ed presidents surveyed by executive search firm Witt/Kieffer.

07/2014
Shirley Mullen is president of Houghton College (N.Y.).

Higher education is in the dock in 2014. The questions are flying:

Why does it cost so much? Why does it cost more each year?

Why do so many students not finish? Why can’t they get good jobs? Why is it not equally accessible to all?

07/2014
There’s value in treating noncredit courses as more than just an add-on to degree programs.

Georgetown University officials had a bit of an epiphany recently about the impact of their noncredit courses. While the offerings had been around since the 1990s, administrators hadn’t realized the big benefits they could bring to the institution.

07/2014
A transcript highlighting the full student experience at Elon University—including study abroad, research and service learning participation—is offered. When an e-transcript request is made, both the traditional one and the Elon Experiences Transcript can be combined into a single PDF file.

Rather than dealing with the intensive labor involved in sending and receiving paper transcripts—and frustration from students and graduates accustomed to automation—most colleges and universities have implemented electronic transcript capabilities.

07/2014

Colleges and universities that have not yet implemented electronic transcripts may be selling their students short.

Not only do e-transcripts require less staff time and ensure better results through trackability and online security, but they also can be delivered almost instantly.

06/2014
William M. Courson is president of Lancaster Pollard Investment Advisory Group.

Monetary policy in the United States took a dramatic turn with the introduction of quantitative easing after the financial crisis of 2008.

06/2014

Cougar Corporate Partners, a new University of Houston giving program, lets companies invest directly in programs that will have an immediate impact on students who make up the future workforce.

06/2014
42 states increased higher education funding in the past year by an average of $449, or 7.2 percent, per student. Yet, per-student funding still remains below pre-recession levels in 48 states

As the long-lasting effects of the Great Recession slowly fade, most states have begun rescinding cuts made to public higher education since 2008. 

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