You are here

Articles: Leadership

This year, the iconic black and white Oreo cookie celebrates its centennial. One hundred years since the chocolate wafer sandwich first went on sale in the U.S., this favorite treat is now beloved around the world with $2 billion in global sales. Second only to the U.S. in Oreo cookie consumption is the world’s most populous country of China. But if you’ve traveled to the Far East, you’ll find the cookie you dunk in Shanghai is nothing like one you savor in St. Louis. In fact, the first Oreos sold in China crumbled.

Sree Sreenivasan is a journalist and technology expert at Columbia School of Journalism. As anyone who has sat in his class or watched one of his YouTube videos will attest, Sreenivasan’s particular strength is in explaining technology to students, faculty, and consumers. He is the former technology reporter for two New York television stations, a social media blogger for CNET, and producer of his own weekly web-based call-in show. But this year, Sreenivasan added another notch to his belt as Columbia University’s first Chief Digital Officer.

  • Yale University (Conn.) President Richard C. Levin will step down at the end of this academic year. During his 20-year tenure, he advanced Yale’s schools and academic programs, particularly strengthening science, engineering, and medicine at the university. He oversaw the largest buildingand renovation program on campus since the 1930s, built partnerships with the city of New Haven, and also expanded Yale’s international activities. Levin has led Yale longer than any other president currently in the Ivy League or the 61-member Association of American Universities.

With the 2012 election only weeks away, Pres. Barack Obama and Gov. Mitt Romney are furiously campaigning for that segment of undecided voters that could make or break their efforts.

At the top of nearly every list of voter concerns this year, of course, is the economy. And because one of the keys to growing the economy is an educated workforce, voters are anxious to hear where each candidate stands on higher education. For the most part, the discussion centers on two issues—affordability and accountability—and the differences are stark.

The higher education chief information officer role has origins that date back around three decades. This relatively nascent position is evolving at breakneck speed, adapting to the rapidly changing information technology landscape and a higher ed space also undergoing unprecedented change. Research conducted for my dissertation reveals that major IT industry developments such as IT consumerization—the bring your own device (BYOD) movement—cloud computing, and the information security suite of issues are all impacting the CIO role in profound ways.

With this issue we are pleased to introduce a new logo for the University Business  brand.

Longtime readers of the magazine might remember the original logo of University Business from its debut in 1998. The covers were adorned with a giant “U” and understated name, punctuated by a bold period and the unattached tagline “Solutions for Higher Education.”

In its infancy, constituent relationship management technology was confined to the admissions and development offices. Campus administrators realized the system was a great way to communicate with prospective students and potential donors, but didn’t realize it would play well with other departments on campus. With a little more maturity, CRM made its way to the alumni relations office, a natural progression from development office technology.

  • The Maine Community College System has lost an integral part of its community. Charles M. Lyons, president of York County Community College, 68, died of cancer August 22. He was president of YCCC from 2006 until the time of his death and previously served as president of the University of Maine at Augusta from 2001 to 2006 and president of the University of Maine at Fort Kent from 1996 to 2001. He was also vice chancellor of the University of Maine System for three years.

The recent buzz about cheating at Harvard—and the media storm that followed—may seem like bad PR, but it can actually serve as an example of just how to act when a crisis strikes.

James Maguire, former associate vice president for Campus Planning and Facilities at Boise State University (Idaho), is now vice chancellor for Administrative Services and chief architect for the University of North Texas System. He began his duties, which include overseeing the system’s design and staff members and collaborating with campus presidents and their senior staff, on July 30. He also previously served as director of Capital Program Implementation for the University of California System and an architect in private practice.

This fall, along with moving its Planning for Higher Education journal from print to completely online, the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) is introducing The Campus-Space MOJO (Multilevel Online Journal Odyssey).

Not long after Pennie Turgeon came to Clark University (Mass.) as its vice president for information technology and chief information officer, one of the university’s functional units undertook a project with a significant technology component to it. Despite the expertise of Turgeon’s team, the other unit saw Information Technology Services as little more than tactical lackeys.

“IT,” Turgeon recalls, “was viewed as the plug-and-chug monkeys.”

If you want a comprehensive view of the world of higher education, look no further than your local bookstore. Every month sees a wave of releases by administrators, scholars, analysts, and more focusing on the current state—good and bad—of higher education. We’ve chosen to highlight here some of the more interesting titles that have arrived at our offices. You’ll probably notice a common thread of thought among them. All the books below advocate dramatic changes to the very nature of higher education, and in many cases, they don’t just suggest change, they demand it.

As we prepare for the Games of XXX across the pond, nestled in the Adirondack Mountains is a quiet Olympic engine fueled by the hopes of tomorrow’s great athletes.  Nowhere is this Olympic ethos more evident than the site of the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics amid the lakes and mountains of Northern New York.

Mitchell E. Daniels Jr.

Indiana Gov. Mitchell E. Daniels Jr. will put his two terms’ worth of experience as Indiana’s 49th governor to use as president of Purdue University (Ind.) beginning in January. He will be its 12th president, succeeding France A. Córdova, who stepped down July 15. Daniels was elected governor in 2004 and re-elected in 2008 with the largest number of votes ever recorded by any candidate for public office in state history.

J. Michael Adams, president of Fairleigh Dickinson University (N.J.) since 1999, has retired, effective June 30.