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Articles: Leadership

The recent buzz about cheating at Harvard—and the media storm that followed—may seem like bad PR, but it can actually serve as an example of just how to act when a crisis strikes.

James Maguire, former associate vice president for Campus Planning and Facilities at Boise State University (Idaho), is now vice chancellor for Administrative Services and chief architect for the University of North Texas System. He began his duties, which include overseeing the system’s design and staff members and collaborating with campus presidents and their senior staff, on July 30. He also previously served as director of Capital Program Implementation for the University of California System and an architect in private practice.

This fall, along with moving its Planning for Higher Education journal from print to completely online, the Society for College and University Planning (SCUP) is introducing The Campus-Space MOJO (Multilevel Online Journal Odyssey).

Not long after Pennie Turgeon came to Clark University (Mass.) as its vice president for information technology and chief information officer, one of the university’s functional units undertook a project with a significant technology component to it. Despite the expertise of Turgeon’s team, the other unit saw Information Technology Services as little more than tactical lackeys.

“IT,” Turgeon recalls, “was viewed as the plug-and-chug monkeys.”

If you want a comprehensive view of the world of higher education, look no further than your local bookstore. Every month sees a wave of releases by administrators, scholars, analysts, and more focusing on the current state—good and bad—of higher education. We’ve chosen to highlight here some of the more interesting titles that have arrived at our offices. You’ll probably notice a common thread of thought among them. All the books below advocate dramatic changes to the very nature of higher education, and in many cases, they don’t just suggest change, they demand it.

As we prepare for the Games of XXX across the pond, nestled in the Adirondack Mountains is a quiet Olympic engine fueled by the hopes of tomorrow’s great athletes.  Nowhere is this Olympic ethos more evident than the site of the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics amid the lakes and mountains of Northern New York.

Mitchell E. Daniels Jr.

Indiana Gov. Mitchell E. Daniels Jr. will put his two terms’ worth of experience as Indiana’s 49th governor to use as president of Purdue University (Ind.) beginning in January. He will be its 12th president, succeeding France A. Córdova, who stepped down July 15. Daniels was elected governor in 2004 and re-elected in 2008 with the largest number of votes ever recorded by any candidate for public office in state history.

J. Michael Adams, president of Fairleigh Dickinson University (N.J.) since 1999, has retired, effective June 30.

Teresa A. Sullivan, forced to resign as president from U.Va. on June 10, was reinstated June 26.

In the two weeks between University of Virginia board members controversially asking Teresa A. Sullivan to resign her position of president on June 10 and her reinstatement on June 26, the university faced donors pulling out and an outpouring of public support for Sullivan.

Sullivan, who began her term on Aug. 1, 2010 after she was unanimously elected by the Board of Visitors in January of that year, was fired on June 10 for reasons that have largely not been made public.

Relative calm now reigns at the University of Virginia after Helen Dragas, chairwoman of U.Va.’s Board of Visitors, tried to engineer dismissal of Theresa Sullivan, the university’s popular president. Now, Sullivan has retained her job, and Gov. Bob McDonnell has reappointed Dragas as Rector for a second term. Rector and president have made a public show of unity. The U.Va. drama involved poor governance practices that resulted in an entirely avoidable crisis.

Presidents, CFOs, and trustee finance committee members will not travel too far down any paths related to sustainability until their associated costs are identified and thoroughly assessed.

Unfortunately, these considerations often still take place within confusing, partially-informed situations on campuses. Budgeting strategically to accomplish multiyear sustainability objectives is among the most significant challenges for a leadership team. Optimally, there needs to be a budget process in place that can flexibly address key sustainability needs at any point in a fiscal year.

Mel Shiavelli

Mel Shiavelli has been named executive vice president at Northern Virginia Community College. The former president and CEO of Harrisburg University of Science and Technology (Pa.) since 2002 and a charter member of the Manufacturing Institute’s Education Council, Shiavelli started in his new role July 1.

Over the course of approximately 200 conversations and interviews for our book, The Sustainable University: Green Goals and New Challenges for Higher Education Leaders (Johns Hopkins, 2012), it became apparent that while many believe the period for orientations to sustainability has passed and the movement has transitioned from one of general citizen awareness to the need for tangible solutions, many

UC Davis demonstrators rallied a week after police pepper-sprayed peaceful demonstrators during an anti-Wall Street protest.

Ever since the University of California system was criticized for the campus police reaction to student protests in 2011—namely the use of pepper spray at UC Davis and batons at UC Berkeley—the system has been investigating and reevaluating its protest reaction policies.

Pradeep K. Khosla

Pradeep K. Khosla has been tapped as the eighth chancellor of the University of California, San Diego. He’ll succeed Marye Anne Fox, who is resigning, on August 1. As dean of Carnegie Mellon University’s (Pa.) Carnegie Institute of Technology for the past eight years, Khosla has initiated undergraduate curriculum reform, successful diversity efforts, multidisciplinary and multi-college research centers, multidisciplinary graduate offerings, and international programs in Europe, Asia, and Africa.