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Articles: Leadership

Margaret Spellings served as secretary of education from 2005 to 2009, during which she led the implementation of the No Child Left Behind Act and spearheaded an access and affordability plan for higher education

Former U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings has been elected president of the 17-campus University of North Carolina system. Spellings is currently president of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

Nancy Cantor is chancellor of Rutgers University-Newark.

As colleges chase the mantle of selectivity over inclusivity, we knowingly turn our backs on the fast-growing, first-generation, low-income, largely black and brown talent pool in the communities right at our gates. We continue to favor a “better prepared,” student body deemed meritorious by narrow metrics of tests they prep for all of their lives.

In 1969, three-quarters of faculty at U.S. colleges and universities were tenured or tenure-track. That number dropped to just above one-quarter in 2013. (Click to enlarge)

Colleges and universities have made spending on administrators and part-time instructors a higher priority than raising salaries of core faculty members who have the biggest impact on learning, says a new report from the Campaign for the Future of Higher Education.

Amy Collier joined Vermont’s Middlebury College in July as its first associate provost for digital learning.

In an emerging trend that illustrates the growing importance of digital strategy in higher education, a handful of universities have named a chief digital officer to their leadership teams to merge the worlds of instruction and IT.

Mary Sue Coleman is a national spokesperson on the educational value of affirmative action and diverse perspectives in the classroom.

Mary Sue Coleman, a former president of the University of Michigan and the University of Iowa, has been named the next president of the Association of American Universities, an organization for research institutions.

She will succeed the retiring Hunter R. Rawlings III, who has held the post since June 2011.

Earlier this year, former College of DuPage President Robert Breuder almost won himself a $763,000 golden parachute to leave the institution in March 2016, three years before his contract expired; that contract has since been voided by the college’s board, and the package reduced to $495,000.

In an apparent response, Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner has signed two new laws limiting terms for community college presidents and restricting their severance packages.

Like it or not, we spend a lot of time on planes and in airports as we travel to campuses across the Nation and around the world. Over the 2015 summer session we sensed winds of change in the aeronautics industry – read as, devising new global security measures; retrofitting outdated air fleets; and creating safe and enjoyable air travel experiences.

The skill set required for today’s top jobs in higher education has never been more extensive or demanding. Boards of Trustees are looking for leadership in several areas: academic authority, fundraising ability, public relations and media savvy, legal and political sensitivity, as well as ease of movement between constituent groups—alumni, students, faculty, parents, donors, business leaders, government—all with significant claims on the president’s time and attention.

Several years ago we shared with University Business readership our prognostications on contemporary polytechnic institutions popping up across the U.S. In relatively short time, higher ed is still surfing the Polytechnic Revival wave at engineering schools, colleges, and universities across the Nation.

The common heritage of Classic Polytechnics extends back to the 1745 founding of the Technische Universität Braunschweig in Germany; the establishment in 1794 of the École Polytechnique in France; and the first American polytechnic, Rensselaer, chartered in 1824.

Brian Casey is leaving the presidency at DePauw University to take over at Colgate.

Brian W. Casey, president of DePauw University in Indiana, will become the 17th president of Colgate University in New York.

Casey has led “DePauw 2020,” a multiyear strategic plan. And under his leadership, DePauw has invested in academic programs, campus projects, student advising and postgraduate planning, plus established and secured more than $56 million for The DePauw Trust.

Prior to joining DePauw in 2008, Casey served as associate dean for academic affairs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard. He is also a former assistant provost at Brown.

ERM policies being executed tend to share one major approach: sharing ownership of various risks campuswide.

With YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets, virtually nothing escapes the public’s notice, and judgment. It’s one reason higher education is paying much more attention to risk management now than in the past.

Effective Sept. 1, James R. Johnsen becomes the 14th president of the University of Alaska System.

Formerly UA’s vice president of administration and chief of staff, Johnsen was most previously the senior vice president of human resources and process transformation at Alaska Communications, a telecommunications corporation based in Anchorage.

Johnsen has committed to travel to all 16 UA campuses during his first year and has said his goals are to expand access and affordability, drive cost effectiveness and promote academic excellence.

New University of Oregon President Michael H. Schill is the former dean and professor at The University of Chicago Law School.

Michael H. Schill took the helm at the University of Oregon on July 1 as its 18th president. He is the former dean and professor at The University of Chicago Law School.

Prior to joining UChicago in 2010, Schill served as dean of UCLA’s School of Law. An expert in property, real estate and housing law and policy, Schill is the author or co-author of three books and more than 40 scholarly articles.

Officials at Antioch College, which was resurrected after being closed several years, expect to have 70 to 75 first-year students in fall 2015. Plans are beginning on a new dorm.

Your school has been rescued—now what? How do you restore students’ and parents’ faith in your revived institution? Institutions like Antioch and Sweet Briar are paving the way.

Rick Cherwitz is a professor in the Moody College of Communication and faculty fellow in the Division of Diversity & Community Engagement at The University of Texas at Austin.

The “faculty contract” is a process by which faculty, in consultation with their departments and colleges, negotiate—and then, over the course of time—renegotiate their work product. This would institute greater flexibility and autonomy in determining the work product of faculty.