You are here

Articles: Classroom

Fall 2014 freshman seminar at University of California, Los Angeles, taught by Grace Hong, an associate professor of gender studies and Asian-American studies

A recent report suggests that while new technologies enable adaptive learning to play a major role in the future of higher ed, most instructors have yet to use the philosophy to its full potential because they are not connecting it with other important innovations.

The classroom furniture and touch-screen displays at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business work in tandem to facilitate collaborative learning. The five-piece desks can be placed in multiple configurations around the displays.

First-year MBA students in the action-based degree program at University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business spend seven weeks working with a U.S. or international company. After that, they form seven-member teams to propose a solution to a problem they encountered in the corporate world.

Wesleyan University President Michael Roth's new book is "Beyond the University: Why Liberal Education Matters"

Read just about any editorial page these days and you’ll see a familiar refrain: “Is a college degree still worth it?” Wesleyan University (Conn.) President Michael Roth argues that not only is it worth it, but that it is more important than ever.

Higher education admittedly faces many challenges over cost and access. Online instruction, certificate courses and skills-based learning offer fixes, but Roth says there is much more to higher education than just getting a job.

Team-taught this summer by professors from three Northwest Five Consortium institutions; students from any of the five member schools could register

Eating food is critical to everyday life, and yet many have the luxury to treat daily sustenance as an afterthought. For some, the connections between food and the larger environmental and social systems that sustain human life are largely invisible.

The need for proctoring derives from the perceived need to prevent “academic dishonesty”, aka cheating. The issues with proctoring include 1) the assumption of guilty until proven innocent (all students are potential cheaters), 2) the cost borne by the student directly or indirectly, 3) the Orwellian loss of privacy, and 4) that the vast majority of students are made to suffer because of a few perceived bad actors.

English: 399-101: Trauma Narratives

Shenandoah University (Va.)

Taught by Michelle Brown, assistant professor of English in world literatures

Several universities, spurred by student groups, are considering adding trigger warnings to course material that some students may find disturbing.

We’ve all seen the familiar warning preceding TV shows: “The following program contains material that may be disturbing.Viewer discretion is advised.” Online, the term “trigger warning” is a common notation on women’s blogs and forums to alert readers, particularly victims of sexual abuse, of content they might want to avoid.

Now several universities, spurred by student groups, are considering adding trigger warnings to course material that some students may find disturbing. That may include references to rape and violence as well as racism.

A Beginner’s Guide to World Domination

Alfred University (N.Y.)

Taught to honors program undergrads by Associate Professor of Psychology Danielle Gagne and Associate Professor of Astronomy David DeGraff, who jointly came up with the idea of a class about supervillains when discussing re-running a class called “The Science and Psychology of Superheroes”

Brad Marcum, the Director of Academic Data Services at the University of Pikeville-Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine

The healthcare industry is in flux. As more Americans acquire insurance, providers are moving towards an integrated care model with doctors, nurses, and social workers, working in coordinated teams. “Traditionally, all the different professionals in healthcare have been stuck in their own silos. But this is changing,” says Brad Marcum, the Director of Academic Data Services at the University of Pikeville (UPike)-Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine (KYCOM).

Rob Peregoodoff, director of learning services at the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business

The blended classroom is no longer the exception, with the majority of universities integrating online learning into nearly every department. Despite the whirlwind innovations in online pedagogy, there has been a much slower race to online assessment. But the schools integrating web testing into their curriculums are reaping benefits campuswide

REL 397D: From Revelation to “The Walking Dead”: Apocalypse Then and Now

Central Michigan University

Taught by Kelly Murphy, a philosophy and religion faculty member

Alison Bechdel's graphic novel, "Fun Home," was assigned at The College of Charleston.

Two South Carolina public institutions are at risk of losing nearly $70,000 in state funding after books with LGBT themes were assigned to freshmen last fall.

For 2013-14, The College of Charleston provided 2,000 freshmen with the graphic novel Fun Home, by Alison Bechdel. It details the relationship of the author and her closeted-gay father, and her own personal coming-out as a lesbian, says Christopher Korey, biology professor and director of the college’s summer reading program. The book wasn’t required reading, but was part of the discussion at campus events.

Ed Rock, Senior Advisor to the President and Provost, and Director of Open Course Initiatives, University of Pennsylvania Law School

University of Pennsylvania was one of Coursera’s first four partners, having started its open course initiative in April 2012. Today, it offers 25 courses from 10 of its 12 schools, and has logged 1.9 million enrollments.

Brian Klaas, senior web systems designer at John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The flipped classroom is a hot topic; faculty are excited to hear more about the model. But, after all the buzz, many are still confused on how to proceed with the flip.