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Articles: Facilities

The Duke University Research Drive Garage earned LEED-certification from the U.S. Green Building Council in 2010.

Educational institutions lead the way in sustainable development and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, says Paul Wessel, executive director of the Green Parking Council.

And even though the U.S. Green Building Council stopped LEED-certifying parking structures in 2011, the Green Parking Council is out to prove that garages can still be environmentally friendly.

The Culinary Institute of the Pacific should be ready for Hawai'i community college students in December 2016.

Sacred Heart University's 117,000-square-foot, $45 million Center for Healthcare Education will create needed teaching space for nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech and language pathology, and health sciences programs—currently distributed among several buildings on campus.

An Association of American Universities study found that 12 percent of students across 27 universities had experienced sexual assault by force or incapacitation since enrollment, and that 17 percent of seniors had experienced this type of sexual assault while at college. Doctoral candidate and researcher Sara Carrigan Wooten says the report comes as no surprise.

Located in downtown Manhattan, the 23,000-square-foot Innovation Center at The New School is an AV-intensive facility that’s open 24/7.

The flexible space has become a hub for collaborative, cross-disciplinary learning for the institution’s nearly 10,000 students, who are spread out on a fragmented urban campus.

Robin Engel, University of Cincinnati’s new vice president for safety and reform.

Criminal justice professor and public safety expert Robin Engel’s extensive background working with both law enforcement and community advocates should give plenty of credibility to her leadership of the police reform initiative launched by University of Cincinnati after an officer-involved shooting near campus this summer.

Academia’s cyber preparedness (or lack thereof) has received less media attention than that of certain retailers and financial institutions, but nonetheless the cyber risks confronting universities are pervasive and alarming. Consider recent breaches suffered by educational institutions. At the University of Maryland, an outside source gained access to a secure records database that held information dating back to 1998, including names, social security numbers, dates of birth, and university identification numbers for over 300,000 people affiliated with the university on two campuses.

ERM policies being executed tend to share one major approach: sharing ownership of various risks campuswide.

With YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other social media outlets, virtually nothing escapes the public’s notice, and judgment. It’s one reason higher education is paying much more attention to risk management now than in the past.

The 34,430-square-foot, three-story Convergent Media Center at Capital University in Ohio will create a hub of activity where multiple disciplines can intersect.

Under construction on the site of a circa-1905 gymnasium, the 34,430-square-foot, three-story Convergent Media Center at Capital University in Ohio will create a hub of activity where multiple disciplines—including communications, electronic media, music and art—can intersect.

Adding green and sustainable elements to facilities during new construction and renovations is no longer an option for colleges and universities—it’s the expectation.

The push for campuswide sustainability and a fresh commitment to student health drive institutions to rethink their dining strategies. This might mean buying more food from local farmers and better educating students about their dietary habits.

Along those lines, Stanford University is the first higher ed institution in the nation to earn the United States Healthful Food Council’s REAL certification—an acronym for Responsible (nutrition), Epicurean (preparation), Agricultural (sourcing) and Leadership.

More students now do their research on the web, bypassing resources offered by their campus libraries as digital usurps print in curricula, a recent survey says.

Colleges and universities cannot require registration of service dogs.

Higher ed administrators with questions about service dogs on campus can find answers in new guidance issued by the U.S. Department of Justice.

After putting off past maintenance projects when the economy stalled, leaders at many institutions are finding it difficult to fit them back into the budget.

Outside the circle of higher ed facilities managers, it’s the shiny new campus buildings that get all the glory. Yet what facilities insiders know all too well is that existing buildings are in dire need of attention.

At 500,000 square feet, the new Science and Engineering Hall at The George Washington University is the largest academic building dedicated to these fields in the nation’s capital.

And it serves thousands of students and roughly 140 faculty members in the heart of the Foggy Bottom campus. The building, known on campus as the SEH, provides eight floors of laboratory space to support both academics and research.

Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill of Missouri says the Clery Act, signed into law in 1990, has outlived its usefulness.

Speaking in June to a national conference hosted by Campus Safety magazine, McCaskill said the current law “doesn’t accomplish squat.” If McCaskill gets her wish, Clery would be replaced with a law that requires more effective reporting. “To be honest with you, I am OK removing the Clery Act completely,” she said.

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