Articles: Administration & Management

Students appreciate that they can register at their convenience and now visit the offices in person only when necessary.

The classic registration scenario of bouncing students from their advisor to select classes, to the Business Office to check for holds, and finally to the Registrar’s Office to stand in line is so 20th century—but hard to escape.

As students “swirl” through higher education, taking classes at multiple institutions either consecutively or simultaneously, the need for institutions to quickly receive and process transcripts becomes more important.

Upfront estimate: When a student signs in, he or she receives a ticket with the likely wait time.

At some point during the year, nearly every one of the 4,400 students at Ogeechee Technical College (Ga.) will have a reason to visit the college’s Student Affairs Center (SAC). This central administrative unit houses Admissions, Financial Aid, the Registrar, and Career Services.

Buying stationery supplies, scientific equipment, and office furniture hardly qualifies as capital expenditures. But shop for enough pens, beakers, and chairs, and the amounts add up.

With most students choosing easy online registration these days, Student Services Center wait times now average just two minutes.

Creating a one-stop student services center in 2005 at Wilkes University (Pa.) seemed like a good idea at the time. These popular organizational structures have typically been a cost-cutting measure introduced to allow educational institutions to do more with less.

Standardization and combined purchasing of desktop computers,  laptops, and printers has brought significant savings.

Buying computers for a college campus is no small feat. In addition to requisitioning and specing them before the purchase, there is the configuration and instillation after the purchase to worry about.

Sometimes increasing efficiency requires cross-functional teams, complex software solutions, and weeks of training and implementation. And sometimes it’s as simple as replacing a clipboard and sign-in sheet with a commonly used program, such as Microsoft Excel.

Eliminating physical documents has made information retrieval a lot less cumbersome and saved precious storage space.

Like most academic institutions, the Mercer University School of Law (Ga.) generates a lot of paperwork.

What used to cost $6,400 in labor to issue W-2 statements in hardcopy now costs under $200 and saves a weekend of work.

Until a few years ago, every January, staff in the Human Resources and Payroll department at George Mason University (Va.) began the arduous task of printing and mailing more than 10,000 W-2 statements for faculty, staff, and student workers.

Avoiding third-party software to make the ERP system work for departments such as athletics saves a bundle and makes for a better, more seamless solution. Score!

Like many institutions over the last several years, Salisbury University (Md.) paid handsomely for an enterprise resource planning system.

Although the University of Virginia has approximately 200,000 living alumni, until recently, the university was only communicating electronically with a fraction of them; 43,000 had email addresses on record.

Students have enough on their plates without having to worry about properly receiving their work-study hours from their financial aid packages. But, paper time cards and siloed systems were making life difficult for students and staff alike at Catawba College (N.C.).

Thanks to an external call center, internal wait times dropped from more than an hour to less than 15 minutes.

Sometimes Plan A and Plan B need to be implemented simultaneously before you can determine which is the better way to go all along.

Permanent password:  Immediate access to a password that’ll stay with students has resulted in a better new student experience.

New students understandably want to get going in their studies as soon as possible.

As the University Business editorial team began judging the entries for this first round of the Models of Efficiency program’s third year, a few things became clear.

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