You are here

Articles: Enrollment & Retention

Several universities, spurred by student groups, are considering adding trigger warnings to course material that some students may find disturbing.

We’ve all seen the familiar warning preceding TV shows: “The following program contains material that may be disturbing.Viewer discretion is advised.” Online, the term “trigger warning” is a common notation on women’s blogs and forums to alert readers, particularly victims of sexual abuse, of content they might want to avoid.

Now several universities, spurred by student groups, are considering adding trigger warnings to course material that some students may find disturbing. That may include references to rape and violence as well as racism.

The students you’re trying to reach today have grown up in a world in which nearly everything was an advertisement. When they were still in diapers they were bombarded with cartoon characters aggressively hawking sugar-laced cereals, and as they’ve grown older, the commercials, emails, texts, pop-ups and social posts crowding their view have only increased in volume.

Colleges and universities with the most Twitter activity are missing out on engaging prospective students via the platform, according to new research from Brandwatch, a social media monitoring and analytics firm.

The analysis used a Thomson Reuters list of the top 10 U.S. university mentions on Twitter from January 31 through March 31. The big finding: The main Twitter handles of these schools were used mostly for broadcasting university-specific and industry news, according to the research.

U.S. law school enrollment has dropped by 36 percent the past three years—and some schools are freezing or reducing tuition in response.

The drop is due to both “job contraction and an overreaction to that contraction,” says Judith Areen, executive director and CEO of The Association of American Law Schools. “The projected number of jobs available is higher than law school enrollment is reflecting.”

Marc C. Whitt is associate vice president for public relations at Eastern Kentucky University.

In our efforts to market and communicate with our various constituents, we often overlook one of the most important support groups we have—our college town.

It’s not intentional. As long time neighbors, we simply take one another for granted. But that’s changing as institutions and their local governments look to one another for creative ways to collaborate and maximize financial and capital resources.

When it comes to online education, careful course development is hardly the only piece needed for successful student outcomes. Colleges without long-time experience in distance learning may be far more likely to overlook the importance of adequate support services. Just how can these needs be met? Here are seven ways to provide exceptional support for online students.

From managing loans to controlling spending, many college students find themselves dealing with a host of financial responsibilities for the very first time. And it’s not uncommon for them to trip up.

Campus financial literacy programs can help students steer clear of some of their most common financial mistakes. The challenge for educators is to find creative and clever ways to get their attention.

Many colleges are advising students how they can save money with digital and used textbooks.

As costly as tuition and textbooks can be, poor planning and time management can raise the prices even higher.

Richard O’Connor, director of financial aid at American International College in Massachusetts, says students at that institution have several options for saving on books. “About half of our students are low income, so just paying tuition can be challenging.”

Michael Silton is the executive director of the UCLA Venture Capital Fund.

Over the last 30 years, the number of college courses teaching entrepreneurship has increased by 95 percent, reflecting an intense demand by U.S. college students.

However, in a survey by Entrepreneur magazine, half of students polled reported that lack of resources was their main reason for not creating startups. And the Young Entrepreneur Council found that nearly three-fourths of college students claim they have no access to on-campus entrepreneurial resources.

A recent NACAC report echoes growing criticism of the SAT and other standardized tests.

There is no significant difference in the success rates of students who submit standardized test scores to colleges and those who don’t. That’s the summary of a NACAC report, “Defining Promise: Optional Standardized Testing Policies in American College and University Admissions," which looked at nearly 123,000 students at 33 public and private institutions of all sizes.

Fewer and fewer institutions are meeting students’ financial need. Per The College Board’s “Trends in College Pricing 2013,” the average net tuition and fee price for students attending four-year public institutions increased by an estimated $1,180 (in 2013 dollars) between 2009-10 and 2013-14.

A single transformational gift can spark unprecedented momentum and result in record-shattering donations to a college or university—as officials at Baylor University in Texas know well.

In early 2012, alumnus Drayton McLane Jr. and his family kicked off donor support for an ambitious $260 million on-campus football stadium. At the time it was the largest capital gift in university history (amount undisclosed).

Michigan legislators have introduced a plan that would allow in-state college-bound students to attend college for free and then, as graduates, pay a percentage of their income back. Known as a “pay it forward” model, the money paid back would go into a special fund to help other students attend college using the same plan.

Two researchers says they have debunked the theory that community college students who transfer to universities graduate at lower rate. (Click to enlarge graphic)

Dozens of reports written over the last four decades have created the generally accepted theory that community college students who transfer to universities graduate at lower rate than do students who start out at four-year institutions.

So when David Monaghan and Paul Attewell, researchers at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, began to analyze those studies to uncover when and why it was happening, they got a surprise: the theory, they determined, is actually a myth.

Some of the nation’s leading film schools, of course, are nestled in the heart of Hollywood. Enter stage left—the Los Angeles Film School.