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Articles: UB Archive

In-person student leader training is quicker and less costly because of the initial online training.

Admissions administrators can view reports of applications that have come in.

Shop staff can stay on task when requestors want an update, as electronic status checks are simple.

Now that the graduate admissions office is no longer inundated with paper, staff can focus on getting applicants an answer quickly.

The story you are about to read is true. Only the names (of the schools) have been changed to protect the innocent.

My son Nick will graduate high school in June and the early months of this year have been spent applying for aid, completing applications, sending in fees, and all the other fun stuff that goes with applying to college.

We want to hear-and share-more efficiency success stories. If your administrative department has used new business processes and/or technology to become more efficient, saving resources such as time and money while also providing excellent service to students or your other constituents, tell us about it.

Reconciliation Act to Provide Better Funding

Each Models of Efficiency entry is evaluated internally by the University Business editorial team, as well as by at least two higher education administrators. Those external judges include:

? Henry Saas, bursar at Xavier University (Ohio)

With comprehensive fees for a residential liberal arts education reaching or surpassing $50,000 per year, more and more people are asking the question: Is it really worth that much money to educate anybody, anywhere, at any time? Are the minds of ambitious, intellectually driven young people worth it?

The early days of the school year are more relaxing for students because facilities staff and others from across campus work hard at summer?s end to ensure every room is move-in ready.

Health legislation having passed, it's difficult to ascertain its specific effects. Winners could include college students. But this can only occur if universities act to fulfill their fiduciary obligations and avoid suspect school health plan practices benefiting the school over the student.

The information in the Public Agenda's latest report "Squeeze Play 2010: Continues Public Anxiety on Cost, Harsher Judgments on How Colleges Are Run" should really cause a shiver to run down the collective backbones of college presidents and administrators. That is assuming they have a backbone. A topic for another discussion I am sure.

Virginia Tech. Columbine. Northern Illinois University. Today, the names of these schools are recognized across the country for the wrong reasons. They are now headlines seared into the national conscience like the names of early battles in a war that academic board-members and senior administrators have never been trained to address. The harsh reality is that - in one form or another - targeted violence is now happening with rising frequency in our schools (as well as our workplaces, public locations and private residences) every single day.

We know you do it. You've told us that you do. Wait—before you get the wrong idea, what I'm referring to is passing around your copy of University Business magazine to colleagues who don't receive it themselves. (What did you think I was talking about?)

University Business is a controlled circulation publication, meaning that it mails to a qualified list of subscribers. That enables us to continue to offer it to you free of charge.

Since the January 12 earthquake that decimated Haiti, U.S. colleges and universities have continued to carry out aid initiatives to support relief efforts. As would be expected, some of those efforts are more traditional (think fundraisers and collection drives), while others involve technology (including social media, websites, and wikis). Other institutions have taken more creative measures.