You are here

Articles: UB Archive

"Women's Ways of Knowing," by Mary Field Belenky et al. (Basic Books, 1986, 1997), captured the challenges women face not just at home, but in classroom settings, and importantly, suggested how educators can help women develop their authentic voices if they emphasize connection over separation, and collaboration over debate.

Ask most campus constituents about driving and parking on campus and they'll probably have a horror story to tell. "People would drive around for hours and be in tears" because they couldn't find a parking spot, says Don Walter, parking department head at the University of Georgia, which has 388 buildings on its 615-acre main campus. A new system for distributing parking permits has led to a safer, happier, and healthier campus, he notes.


Not having articulation agreements isn't the only thing holding students back when transferring from a two-year to a four-year institution. Most of these students still have the life issues that prompted them to attend a community college initially. An education model that can help them overcome these challenges is a university center, which combines the degree completion opportunities of four-year schools with the local convenience of a community college campus. "Busy adults can't travel and not everyone can learn online," notes Cary Israel, president of Collin College (Texas).

Seizing opportunity in a time of crisis can be risky, but in the depths of the recent recession, Muhlenberg College (Pa.) made a bold move, launching three very ambitious construction projects with the potential to strengthen the college's competitive position swiftly and dramatically. The project's an addition to our student union, a music/dance rehearsal space, and a multipurpose addition to our Hillel House that included new offices for our sociology/anthropology department - totaled more than $27 million.

Similar to the cold and flu season, no one is immune to being affected by the current economic downturn. The largest foundations and endowments in the world and most prestigious universities in the nation are also at risk of "getting sick."

Universities build residence halls with a variety of existing factors: demanding schedules, difficult sites, restricted budgets, and predetermined needs. Frequently universities need early involvement of the structural engineer to meet these requirements. However, most universities don't realize that early involvement of a structural engineer doesn't only help with the scheduling. It also helps in terms of cost and in decisions of which materials may be best for the budget and location.

Several years ago, I joined a University Cashier department as the first new employee hired after several staff cuts and a hiring freeze. Upon hiring me, my new manager enlightened me about the situation, and how unable he felt to "do any more with less." After thinking about what he said for a few weeks, I wondered if we should change our tack: rather than keep trying to do more, maybe we should do less.

We asked what makes your administrative department an efficiency model, and you delivered. Everyone in higher education is being forced to do more with less. Stellar campus administrative departments are continually working to also do it all better than ever before.

The maintenance shop crew's headquarters are in the basement of the housing complex. The crew includes staff with various areas of expertise.

Health legislation having passed, it's difficult to ascertain its specific effects. Winners could include college students. But this can only occur if universities act to fulfill their fiduciary obligations and avoid suspect school health plan practices benefiting the school over the student.

The information in the Public Agenda's latest report "Squeeze Play 2010: Continues Public Anxiety on Cost, Harsher Judgments on How Colleges Are Run" should really cause a shiver to run down the collective backbones of college presidents and administrators. That is assuming they have a backbone. A topic for another discussion I am sure.

Virginia Tech. Columbine. Northern Illinois University. Today, the names of these schools are recognized across the country for the wrong reasons. They are now headlines seared into the national conscience like the names of early battles in a war that academic board-members and senior administrators have never been trained to address. The harsh reality is that - in one form or another - targeted violence is now happening with rising frequency in our schools (as well as our workplaces, public locations and private residences) every single day.

Elmhurst College (Ill.) shares many traits with colleges throughout the country - a private liberal arts college with a religious affiliation; founded over a century ago; located within a quiet residential neighborhood; roughly 38 acres in size; hosts students from many states and countries; and comprised of about 2,400 traditional undergraduates and 230 graduate students.

With comprehensive fees for a residential liberal arts education reaching or surpassing $50,000 per year, more and more people are asking the question: Is it really worth that much money to educate anybody, anywhere, at any time? Are the minds of ambitious, intellectually driven young people worth it?