Articles: UB Archive

Mark your calendar for EduComm 2010, which returns to Las Vegas, June 7-9. This year's conference promises to be more informative, more cutting edge, and more value-packed than ever.

It is easy to communicate with constituents when you are talking about enrollment growth, a large financial gift, faculty accomplishments and new building projects. But what about when the going gets rough? What then?

It's 2010. Do you know where your mobile web visitors are? If your college or university hasn't managed yet to provide an online presence for this growing section of its target audience, it should probably have been named a New Year's resolution.

In America, we lavish attention on our most talented fellow citizens—star athletes, film and television celebrities, brilliant scholars and scientists, and sometimes even college presidents—but we also insist that our celebrities not act like self-styled royalty.

Over the past two years, Arizona State University has opened two new schools at its campuses in the Phoenix area. But these educational additions are not training future social workers, lawyers, or business executives.

Are you watching all the for-profit universities'; stocks soar as their online programs grow by double-digit percentages?

People rarely work in isolation. But it's not always easy to meet in person to work on a project. Connecting online can be done from almost anywhere. The collaboration possibilities run the gamut from passing a Word document back-and-forth via e-mail to holding a multiparty videoconference.

The recently concluded holiday break wasn't much fun for those very bright but struggling freshmen students who got their first taste ever of academic failure.

Natural and man-made disasters cause immediate harm and can also have an impact for months or years afterward.

At the University of San Diego (USD), while students and faculty look forward to summertime, the USD Wireless Team is working without any real breaks. The USD Wireless Team knows that summer brings more than 12,000 visitors on campus for events, sports camps, and conferences.

Many colleges and universities are confronting even more complex challenges than usual. Indeed, the timing, intensity, and consequences of some of the most serious challenges qualify them as outright crises.

Every year, college classrooms and other educational facilities waste millions of dollars in energy costs. Heat seeps out of under-insulated walls. Outdated energy control systems keep classrooms too hot or too cold in the winter.

The stubborn persistence of internet websites pandering to campus gossip, encouraging students to post salacious anonymous attacks on classmates, faculty, and staff, encourages a culture of rumor that challenges the essential values and identities of American universities.

Determining the fair value of assets and liabilities on a university's financial statement has become increasingly stringent, particularly under the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Accounting Standards Codification Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (Topic 820), formerly FAS 157.

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