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Articles: UB Archive

Universities build residence halls with a variety of existing factors: demanding schedules, difficult sites, restricted budgets, and predetermined needs. Frequently universities need early involvement of the structural engineer to meet these requirements. However, most universities don't realize that early involvement of a structural engineer doesn't only help with the scheduling. It also helps in terms of cost and in decisions of which materials may be best for the budget and location.

Several years ago, I joined a University Cashier department as the first new employee hired after several staff cuts and a hiring freeze. Upon hiring me, my new manager enlightened me about the situation, and how unable he felt to "do any more with less." After thinking about what he said for a few weeks, I wondered if we should change our tack: rather than keep trying to do more, maybe we should do less.

We asked what makes your administrative department an efficiency model, and you delivered. Everyone in higher education is being forced to do more with less. Stellar campus administrative departments are continually working to also do it all better than ever before.

The maintenance shop crew's headquarters are in the basement of the housing complex. The crew includes staff with various areas of expertise.

The whole Document Imaging Taskforce can gather in the space of the Enrollment Management office that was reclaimed from file storage.

Director of Admission Larry Anderson and his staff, including Jennifer Shepard (left) and Mary Hrdina, can now make scholarship offers faster and with more accuracy.

In-person student leader training is quicker and less costly because of the initial online training.

Admissions administrators can view reports of applications that have come in.

Shop staff can stay on task when requestors want an update, as electronic status checks are simple.

Now that the graduate admissions office is no longer inundated with paper, staff can focus on getting applicants an answer quickly.

Health legislation having passed, it's difficult to ascertain its specific effects. Winners could include college students. But this can only occur if universities act to fulfill their fiduciary obligations and avoid suspect school health plan practices benefiting the school over the student.

The information in the Public Agenda's latest report "Squeeze Play 2010: Continues Public Anxiety on Cost, Harsher Judgments on How Colleges Are Run" should really cause a shiver to run down the collective backbones of college presidents and administrators. That is assuming they have a backbone. A topic for another discussion I am sure.

Virginia Tech. Columbine. Northern Illinois University. Today, the names of these schools are recognized across the country for the wrong reasons. They are now headlines seared into the national conscience like the names of early battles in a war that academic board-members and senior administrators have never been trained to address. The harsh reality is that - in one form or another - targeted violence is now happening with rising frequency in our schools (as well as our workplaces, public locations and private residences) every single day.

We know you do it. You've told us that you do. Wait—before you get the wrong idea, what I'm referring to is passing around your copy of University Business magazine to colleagues who don't receive it themselves. (What did you think I was talking about?)

University Business is a controlled circulation publication, meaning that it mails to a qualified list of subscribers. That enables us to continue to offer it to you free of charge.

Since the January 12 earthquake that decimated Haiti, U.S. colleges and universities have continued to carry out aid initiatives to support relief efforts. As would be expected, some of those efforts are more traditional (think fundraisers and collection drives), while others involve technology (including social media, websites, and wikis). Other institutions have taken more creative measures.

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