Inquiring Minds Want to Know

Inquiring Minds Want to Know

UNIVERSITY BUSINESS HAS ENJOYED AN active and opinionated readership for many years. The articles in each issue are written with your help and through your perspective. We highlight some of your voices each month through forums such as our "Viewpoint" and "End Note" columns, as well as online. Now we want to give more of you the opportunity to speak out on important issues of the day in our pages.

This fall we'll be publishing a special section of University Business called "The State of Higher Education" that will be based on reader insights on topics of the greatest concern. We're looking for your insights and opinions. It's an opportunity for presidents, vice presidents, chancellors, CXOs, provosts, deans, and association leaders to speak out on a broad range of issues through essays and opinion pieces.

How long should they be? That's up to you. Maybe you have just a brief comment to make, or perhaps you'd like to contribute a longer piece (no more than 1,500 words, please). We just ask that you submit them by August 6. Submissions can be sent to me at the address below. The content, which will be published in print and online, should address some of the pressing issues that concern you. For example:

We're looking for your insights and opinions.

- How will higher education be impacted by governmental calls for greater accountability and access?

- What will the recent student loan scandals mean for your institution, and for higher ed in general?

- Should the accreditation system be overhauled?

- How should colleges and universities prepare for the predicted decline in student population?

- How will changing student demographics affect campus resources?

- What about tuition trends and discounting?

- How can college and university leaders better control unbalanced sports spending?

- How should college and university administrators and staff respond to student mental health issues in which other students' safety may be at risk?

- How is technology changing not only the way your students learn but also how your institution operates?

- What can be done to help ensure that tomorrow's institutions have qualified leaders?

- Are the SAT and ACT still valid predictors of higher education success? And if not, what should replace them?

- Is there any value to the controversial college ranking systems popularized in the mainstream media? If not, how can universities escape the rankings without negative consequences in public perception?

Let us know what's on your mind.

University Business is hitting the road with the first of a series of Leadership Seminars this fall. Readers in Northeastern states may wish to mark their calendars for one of the full-day seminars we'll be producing in October.

Entitled "New Paths to Advancement," the seminars will feature a panel of nationally recognized experts who will discuss innovative ways that colleges and universities can improve their financial health through marketing, retention, and fundraising.

The two inaugural seminars are scheduled for Oct. 9 in Worcester, Mass., and Oct. 10 in Tarrytown, N.Y.

You can find more information the University Business Leadership Seminars in this issue or by visiting our website at www.universitybusiness.com/seminars.


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